The Future of Watching Sports is Virtual Reality

Fox Sports teamed up with LiveLike to build a virtual reality app that would allow them to stream sporting events to cell phones and VR devices. I’ve been calling this technology since I watched my first virtual reality sample video two years ago. Yes, I’m psychic. That video was shot from the stage of a Paul McCarthy concert and having that viewpoint forever changed what I thought of this technology.

The Future of Sports Will Be Virtual Reality

With this technology seeming to be on the rise, I think we are seeing a new visual technology that will succeed where 3D failed. If sporting networks and stadiums were smart, they would already be investing in this technology for purchase. I’m a Baltimore Ravens fan, but being located in Ohio doesn’t make it easy for me to get out to home games for the Ravens. Virtual reality would change that. I would gladly buy a VR pass for a game and watch it from the comfort of my favorite recliner. Geeky, yes. In my house, in my worn out Raven’s shirt and my underwear, hell yes!

Service and Options Are Key

The most important part of virtual reality will be the service from the providers end. As long as I can count on a steady feed with no interruption, I will log in and watch. If the stream is delayed, choppy, or not high quality, you will lose me. VR needs to have options for viewers. Part of the draw is being in an environment remotely, but feeling like you are there. Sound is key, but so is the actual location of the view. For football games, a game field option would be awesome, but so would 50 yard line seats.

Marketing Could Be Viral, Easily

This type of offer shouldn’t be hard to market, in fact, it should go viral. If these companies can show the view in a commercial that zooms out to the viewer in their house, you can grab an audience. VR has momentum already, and I think it has peaked the curiosity of consumers. Tapping this audience should be easy, also considering that most sports viewers are up-to-date on most technology itself. Selling the fact that you don’t need a lot of devices to actually get this work is also a selling point. Hell, I’m ready to buy season tickets and it’s not even an option.

I can’t wait for this tech, and you shouldn’t either.